Baseball's Steroid Era - News Lists, Timelines, Quotes, Statistics

Baseball's Steroid Era

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List of Players Linked to Steroids & HGH
Implicated Players (33)

Note: Players who admitted using PEDs after they were implicated still appear on this list.
The information in this list summarizes news reports linking these players to steroids, steroid precursors, human growth hormone, or other drugs banned by MLB (excluding amphetamines).

Mark McGwire May 1992

Linked To: Steroids (Winstrol, Testosterone, Equipose)

The Story: During an FBI investigation codenamed 'Operation Equine' in 1992, officers turned up steroid dealer, Curtis Wenslaff. Wenzlaff's training-session notes show he put McGwire on a mix of Winstrol V, testosterone and Equipoise. In Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have personally injected McGwire with steroids. McGwire admitted using the Androstenedione found in his locker but it was legal in the United States and not banned by MLB at the time.

Manny Alexander July 2000

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific)

The Story: Police found vials of steroids and syringes in the glove compartment of Alexander's Mercedes on June 30, 2000. Alexander had loaned the vehicle to team bat boy, Carlos Cowart, who has no license and a three-page criminal record and was driving the car when the steroids were found. Police found no evidence linking the steroids to Cowart who was described as 'not a weightlifter or anything even remotely like that.. not even a beginning weightlifter.' The New York Times later reported that Alexander's name was on the enveope that contained the steroids.

Chuck Finley May 2002

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific)

The Story: During divorce proceedings, Finley's wife, Tawny Kitaen, in an official declaration, stated that Finley used steroids amongst other drugs during their marriage. She witnessed Finley injecting the steroids, and claimed that he bragged about being able 'to get around drug testing' in Major League Baseball.

Barry Bonds December 2003

Linked To: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream), HGH

The Story: Testifying before the BALCO Grand Jury, Bonds admitted to using two substances believed to be undetectable steroids from BALCO. He testified that he believed The Cream was an arthritis balm and the THG was flaxseed oil. Both substances were given to him by his friend and trainer, Greg Anderson. Later, the book, Game of Shadow, documented Bonds's use of many performance enhancing drugs. Bonds was eventually indicted for perjury and obstruction of justice. His confidential testimony was leaked to the San Fransisco Chronicle. Excerpts were first published in a Dec. 3, 2004 article entitled What Bonds told BALCO grand jury.

Comments: "I never asked Greg. When he said it was flaxseed oil, I just said, whatever."

Marvin Bernard December 2003

Linked To: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream)

The Story: BALCO court documents detailing IRS agent Jeff Novitzky's interview with Greg Anderson, show that Anderson named Bernard as one of his 'little guys' using steroids and HGH. During the BALCO raid, vice president, Jim Valente told Novitzky that Bernard was one of many players receiving the undectable drugs, The Clear (THG) and The Cream.

Randy Velarde December 2003

Linked To: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream)

The Story: IRS agent Jeff Novitzky found 'paperwork' tying several players including Velarde, to BALCO. Subsequently during the BALCO raid, vice president Jim Valente told Novitzky that Velarde was one of many players receiving the undetectable drugs, The Clear (THG) and The Cream.

Wilson Alvarez February 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific), HGH

The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have educated and personally injected Alvarez with steroids. Canseco claims Alvarez wanted to lose weight and so he put him on human growth hormone (HGH) and a 'lean cycle of steroids.'

Bret Boone February 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific)

The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco describes an encounter at second base with Boone where Canseco comments about Boone's physique to which Bonne replies 'Shh, don't tell anybody.' Canseco calls him an 'obvious' user with a 'small frame and huge arms'.

Ozzie Canseco February 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific)

The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco confirms his brother Ozzie's steroid use. Jose mentions it only in passing, and does not go into any detail.

Juan Gonzalez February 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin and/or Winstrol, Testosterone), HGH

The Story: In 2001, Gonzalez' trainer, Angel Presinal was questioned by Canadian police when he picked up an unmarked bag containing anabolic steroids and Clenbuterol. He told the police that the bag belonged to Gonzalez, then with the Indians. Four years later, in Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have educated Gonzalez, along with Rafael Palmeiro and Ivan Rodriguez, about steroids when they were teammates in Texas (1992-1994). He subsequently claims to have acquired steroids on behalf of all three before personally injecting each of them 'many times.' Canseco says all three used a combination of HGH and steroids (Deca-Durabolin and/or Winstrol) and 'a small dose' of injectable testosterone.

Dave Martinez February 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific)

The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have educated and personally injected Martinez with steroids. Canseco implicates Martinez to show that it's not only sluggers who use steroids.

Ivan Rodriguez February 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin and/or Winstrol, Testosterone), HGH

The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have educated Rodriguez, along with Rafael Palmeiro and Juan Gonzalez, about steroids when they were teammates in Texas. He subsequently claims to have acquired steroids on behalf of all three before personally injecting each of them 'many times.' Canseco says all three used a combination of HGH and steroids (Deca-Durabolin and/or Winstrol) and 'a small dose' of injectable testosterone.

Tony Saunders February 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific), HGH

The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco describes intimate conversations with Saunders about his dosages of steroids and his use of HGH. Canseco even claims to warned Saunders to 'dose that stuff down' before Saunders broke his arm throwing a pitch in 1999.

Miguel Tejada February 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific), HGH

The Story: Rafael Palmeiro said his positive test for Stanozolol may have been caused by a tainted B12 shot he got from Tejada. In Juiced Jose Canseco said he educated Tejada about the benefits of steroids. In the Mitchell Report, Adam Piatt said he purchased HGH and testosterone for Tejada in 2003. Tejada later pleaded guilty to "making representations to Congress." Tejada maintains that he never used any of the performance enhancing drugs.

Lenny Dykstra April 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin), HGH

The Story: Former business partner Lindsay Jones sued Dykstra over an ownership stake in a car wash business. In the suit Jones claimed that Dykstra used steroids and gambled on major league games (though Dykstra never received the profits). The suit contained a sworn statement from bodybuilder and convicted steroid dealer, Jeff Scott, who later said he injected Dykstra with steroids 'more times than I can count.' Details of the civil suit were published in a Apr. 24, 2005 Los Angeles Times article entitled Fingering 'Nails.'

Dave Hollins November 2005

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific)

The Story: Bodybuilder, Jeff Scott claims Hollins visited him frequently and asked about steroids while trying to gain weight after learning he had diabetes in 1993. Hollins denies ever being to Scotts apartment, but Scott, as well as another unnamed source both claim that Hollins was there often.

Roger Clemens October 2006

Linked To: Steroids (Winstrol, Anadrol, Deca-Durabolin, Sustanon), HGH

The Story: In 2005, in his book, Juiced, Jose Canseco said he thought Clemens used steroids but acknowledged that he had no proof. In 2006, the Los Angeles Times reported that Clemens was one of the redacted names from the Jason Grimsley affidavit. Eventually unsealed, the affidavit did not name Clemens proving the 2006 LA Times article erroneous. In December 2007 Clemens became the biggest name in the Mitchell Report. His former trainer, Brian McNamee, told Mitchell that he personally injected Clemens many times beginning in 1998. Clemens was first implicated in an Oct. 1, 2006 Los Angeles Times Article entitled Clemens Is Named in Drug Affidavit.

Andy Pettitte October 2006

Linked To: HGH

The Story: In 2006, the Los Angeles Times reported that Pettitte was one of the redacted names from the Jason Grimsley affidavit. Eventually unsealed, the affidavit did not name Pettitte proving the 2006 LA Times article erroneous. In December 2007 Pettitte was named in the Mitchell Report. Brian McNamee said that he injected Pettitte with HGH 2-4 times. Pettitte later confessed to using HGH on two separate occasions. Pettitte was first implicated in an Oct. 1, 2006 Los Angeles Times Article entitled Clemens Is Named in Drug Affidavit.

Comments: Regarding my owrl use of HGH, as I have admitted publicly, I used it for two days in 2OO2 to attempt to recover from an elbow injury. I also have told the committee's attorneys, and I restate it here, that in 2OO4, when I tore the flexor tendon in my pitching arm, I again used HGH two times in one day out of frustration and in a futile attempt to recover. Unfortunately, I needed surgery on the arm later in the year. I regret these lapses in judgment.

Brian Roberts October 2006

Linked To: Steroids (Non-specific)

The Story: In 2006, the Los Angeles Times reported that Roberts was one of the redacted names from the Jason Grimsley affidavit. Eventually unsealed, the affidavit did not name Roberts and the Times ran a correction. In the Mitchell Report, Larry Bigbie said that Roberts had told him he had used steroids "once or twice." After the report's release, Roberts admitted to trying them once, in 2003. Roberts was first implicated in an Oct. 1, 2006 Los Angeles Times Article entitled Clemens Is Named in Drug Affidavit.

Comments: "In 2003, when I took one shot of steroids, I immediately realized that this was not what I stood for or anything that I wanted to continue doing. I never used steroids, human growth hormone or any other performance-enhancing drugs prior to or since that single incident."

Jay Gibbons October 2006

Linked To: Steroids (Testosterone), HGH (Genotropin), HCG

The Story: In 2006, the Los Angeles Times reported that Gibbons was one of the redacted names from the Jason Grimsley affidavit. Eventually unsealed, the affidavit did not name Gibbons proving the 2006 LA Times article erroneous. In 2007, Sports Illustrated reported that Gibbons had received six shipments of HGH (Genotropin), two shipments of testosterone, and two shipments of HCG between 2003 and 2005, all from the recently raided Signature Pharmacy. MLB issued a 15 game suspension, which they later revoked. Gibbons was first implicated in an Oct. 1, 2006 Los Angeles Times Article entitled Clemens Is Named in Drug Affidavit.

Comments: "I am deeply sorry for the mistakes that I have made. I have no excuses and bear sole responsibility for my decisions. Years ago, I relied on the advice of a doctor, filled a prescription, charged the HGH, which is a medication, to my credit card and had only intended to help speed my recovery from my injuries and surgeries."

Gary Matthews Jr. February 2007

Linked To: Human Growth Hormone (Genotropin)

The Story: The Story: Matthews name came up as a customer of Applied Pharmacy Services in Mobile Alabama when the pharmacy was busted for selling steroids and human growth hormone over the internet prescribed in illegal ways. It was later revealed at SI.com that Matthews Jr. had ordered human growth hormone in 2004. Matthews Jr. was first implicated in a Feb. 27, 2007 Albany Times Union article entitled Albany DA raids Fla. Steroids Center.

Jerry Hairston Jr. March 2007

Linked To: Human Growth Hormone (Genotropin)

The Story: Hairston Jr. reportedly ordered at least two shipments of human growth hormone beginning in 2004 from Applied Pharmacy Services in Mobile, Alabama. Hairston Jr. was first implicated in a Mar. 2, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Documents: Hairston received HGH.

Comments: "It's disturbing. I have no idea what this is about. I'm really in the dark... Not one time have I taken steroids or anything like that. I would never do anything like that to jeopardize my career or my family's name... I know I'm going to be OK because I know what I've done and haven't done... I would never do anything to discredit the game. The game has been good not only to myself but my entire family."

Darren Holmes March 2007

Linked To: Human Growth Hormone (Genotropin) and Testosterone

The Story: Holmes ordered and received Human Growth Hormone from Applied Pharmacy Servies in October 2003. Holmes said the HGH arrived with unsolicited testosterone which made him suspicious. He claims to have never used any of the drugs he received. Holmes was first implicated in a Mar. 8, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Updates on the Steroid Sting.

Rick Ankiel September 2007

Linked To: Human Growth Hormone (Saizen and Genotropin)

The Story: Ankiel ordered and received Human Growth Hormone from Signature Pharmacy through The Health and Rejuvenation Center (THARC) in Palm Beach, Florida in 2004, just before it was banned by Major League Baseball. Ankiel was first implicated in a September 7, 2007 New York Daily News article entitled Rick Ankiel received 12-month supply of HGH, News learns.

Comments: "I don't know anything about the pharmacy, and I don't know anyone there. I've never purchased or ordered anything from that pharmacy."

Troy Glaus September 2007

Linked To: Anabolic Steroids (Nandrolone and Testosterone)

The Story: Glaus ordered and received anabolic steroids from Signature Pharmacy through New Hope Health Center between September 2003 and May 2004, both substances were banned by Major League Baseball at the time. Glaus was reportedly prescribed drugs by controversial doctor, Roman Scruggs. Glaus was first implicated in a September 7, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Source: Glaus received steroids.

Scott Schoeneweis October 2007

Linked To: Anabolic Steroids (Stanozolol and Testosterone)

The Story: Schoeneweis reportedly received anabolic steroids from Signature Pharmacy through New Hope Health Center based in California between May 2003 and June 2004, both substances were banned by Major League Baseball at the time. Schoeneweis' was first implicated in a September 7, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Source: Schoeneweis received 'roids; lefty denies it.

Comments: "I don't even know what (Signature Pharmacy) is. Steroids in Florida? I never received anything from Florida. I'm not going to comment. I never even heard of it."

Matt Williams November 2007

Linked To: Anabolic Steroids (Nandrolone and Testosterone Cypionate) HGH, Clomiphene, Novarel

The Story: Williams reportedly received over $16 000 worth of anabolic steroids and HGH among other drugs from Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center between March 2002 and sometime in 2005. Williams received two shipments of HGH after he retired in 2003. Williams was first implicated in a November 8, 2007 San Francisco Chronicle article entitled Baseball's Jose Guillen, Matt Williams bought steroids from clinic.

Jose Guillen November 2007

Linked To: Anabolic Steroids (Nandrolone, Testosterone Cypionate, Testosterone Propionate, Stanozolol) HGH (Genotropin), Clomiphene, Novarel

The Story: Guillen reportedly received over $19 000 worth of anabolic steroids and HGH among other drugs from Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center between May 2002 and June 2005. Guillen received at least two shipments of steroids after they were banned and tested for by Major League Baseball. Guillen was issued a 15 game suspension by MLB, which was later revoked. Guillen was first implicated in a November 8, 2007 San Francisco Chronicle article entitled Baseball's Jose Guillen, Matt Williams bought steroids from clinic.

Ismael Valdez November 2007

Linked To: Anabolic Steroids (testosterone), HGH (unknown), Clomiphene, Novarel, Arimidex

The Story: Valdez reportedly received HGH among other drugs from Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center in 2002 while a member of the Seattle Mariners. Valdez received over $11 000 worth of performance-enhancing drugs that season. Valdez was first implicated in a November 8, 2007 San Francisco Chronicle article entitled Baseball's Jose Guillen, Matt Williams bought steroids from clinic.

Magglio Ordonez January 2008

Linked To: Unknown

The Story: According to reports, Jose Canseco wanted Magglio Ordonez to invest in a movie project in exchange for not naming him in Canseco's second book, Vindicated. Canseco was reportedly trying to raise funds for a documentary based on his first book, Juiced. The matter was referred to the FBI by Major League Baseball and Ordonez's agent, Scott Boras. Ordonez chose not to pursue any legal action. In Vindicated, Canseco said he taught and injected Ordonez with steroids. Ordonez was first implicated in a January 24, 2008 New York Times article entitled Canseco Is Said to Seek Favor to Omit Name.

Alex Rodriguez March 2009

Linked To: Steroids (Primobolan, Testosterone)

The Story: Released April 2008, in Jose Canseco's second book, Vindicated, Canseco claims to have introduced Rodriguez to a trainer who was a steroid expert and supplier. Canseco refused to name the trainer saying only "the timing is not right." In February 2009, Sports Illustrated's Selena Roberts and David Epstein reported that Rodriguez has tested positive for Primobolan (an anaabolic steroid) and testosterone in MLB's anonymous 2003 "survey" testing. Rodriguez, in an interview with ESPN's Peter Gammons, admitted using a "banned substance." Later, at his spring training press conference, Rodriguez admitted using what he called "boli" from 2001 to 2003. Rodriguez was first implicated in Canseco's book, Vindicated: Big Names, Big Liars, and the Battle to Save Baseball.

Comments: "Going back to 2001, my cousin started telling me about a substance that you could purchase over-the-counter in DR know as, in the streets, it's known as boli or bole. It was his understanding that it would give me a dramatic energy boost and (was) otherwise harmless. My cousin and I, one more ignorant than the other, decided it was a good idea to start taking it.

Mike Piazza March 2009

Linked To: Steroids

The Story: Piazza reportedly admitted that he used performance enhancing drugs to at least one unnamed reporter. Long rumored to have used steroids, at least two former players were quoted as saying they were sure that Piazza used. Former New York Times reporter, Murray Chass, said that he had been aware of Piazza's severe back acne (a common side-effect of using steroids) and that it cleared up in 2004 when MLB instituted its first testing program with penalties. Piazza was named most significantly in Jeff Pearlman's book, The Rocket That Fell To Earth.

Todd Greene April 2009

Linked To: Steroids

The Story: Greene reportedly used steroids prescribed to him by Dr. Ramon Scruggs, and "anti-aging doctor" under investigation by federal authorities since 2007. Greene reportedly told investigators that he was at a "critical point" in his career and was worried that he wouldn't be able to provide for his family. Greene was named in Michael Schmidt's New York Times article, Risk, Reward, Steroids: Inside a Tempting World of Easy Steroids.

Sammy Sosa June 2009

Linked To: Unknown

The Story: According to the New York Times, Sammy Sosa was one of 104 players that tested positive for a performance enhancing drugs during Major League Baseball's 2003 survey testing. The Times cited "lawyers with knowledge of the drug-testing results" but said they did not know for which drug Sosa had tested positive. Sosa was first implicated in Michael Schmidt's New York Times article, Sosa Is Said to Test Positive in 2003.

none
The List
« 129 »
Mitchell Report - 47
Admitted - 16
Implicated By Others - 34
MLB Suspensions - 27
Other - 4
Suspended for non-analytical evidence that player violated MLB drug policy.


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